A small flame

A small flame

Brothers







So, I can see why becoming part of a new family would have really meant something to believers in Paul's day. But I didn't understand how adoption into God's family is supposed to impact me as part of a body of believers. After reading Dr Moore's book, I feel I have a much better feel for what it should look like. So very thought-provoking!






Do you notice the loneliness all round us? . . . We're all designed for community – for brothers and sisters. . . We will all find a brotherhood, for good or for ill, whether its in a labor union, an international peace-keeping organization, or the Ku Klux Klan. We'll identify ourselves by who is “one of us” - part of our “tribe”. Unfortunately, this brotherhood is skin-deep.



Our churches fall for the same thing all the time. We can buy Bibles in niche editions . . . We order our worship services around our age groups . . . Our congregations are made of people who look, talk, and think just like we do. And it never occurs to us that this is the same kind of unity the world has to offer. . . .


What would it mean, though, if we took the radical notion of being brothers and sisters seriously? What would happen if your church saw an elderly woman no one would ever confuse with 'cool' on her knees at the front of the church praying with a body-pierced 15-year-old anorexic girl? What would happen if your church saw a white millionaire corporate vice president being mentored by a Latino minimum wage-earning janitor because they both know the janitor is more mature in the things of Christ?






this photo by Elle Photography



Here's where, I think, the nub of the whole issue lies. Adoption would become a priority in our churches if our churches themselves saw our brotherhood and sisterhood in the church itself rather than in our fleshly identities. For some Christians – maybe for you – it's hard to imagine how an African- American could love a white Ukrainian baby, how a Haitian teenager could call Swedish parents “Mom” and “Dad”. Of course that's hard to imagine, when so many of our churches can't even get over the differences as trivial as musical style.



If we had fewer “white” churches and “black” churches, fewer “blue collar” churches and “white collar” churches, maybe we'd see better what Jesus tells us when he says we've come into a new household with one Spirit, one Father, one Christ. In fact, maybe the reason we wonder whether “adopted” children can really be brothers and sisters is because we so rarely see it displayed in our pews.
- Adopted for Life pp 37-39
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2 comments:

Karen said...

This book has some great thoughts, I've been enjoying the excerpts you've put up. Today's made me grateful for a church that is not made up of people like Sean and I...it really is pretty diverse and we've been enjoying that!

Jennifer said...

Ok, I know it was a thought provoking post and all, but I got caught up with Matthew's mullet and the fact that Thomas looked like Thomas even as a baby!